Skull base

Malignant Otitis Externa – Clinical presentation, Diagnosis and Treatment

Malignant otitis externa (MOE) is an aggressive and potentially life-threatening infection of the soft tissues of the external ear and its surrounding structures, which quickly spreads to involve periosteum and bone of the skull base. The most common causative organism of malignant otitis externa is Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Though this is not a neoplastic disease, it’s

Its bleeding, bleeding and bleeding..

A 13-year-old male child presented to pediatric ENT unit, with chief complaints of left side nasal obstruction progressive and spontaneous nasal bleed, continuing nasal discharge since two months. intermittent episodes of headache which used to be relieved by analgesics. Past history No episodes of nasal bleeding before two months but intermittent nasal discharge. On examination

TNM Staging of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma (AJCC 8)

Malignancies arising in nasopharynx / nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) have different natural behavior and therapeutic consideration than other head and neck cancers. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma also has a very skewed geographic and ethnic distribution, with 80% of the global burden in Asian countries.

Anatomy and Physiology of Nasopharynx

The nasopharynx is an air-containing cavity at the back of the nose, which occupies the uppermost extent of the aerodigestive tract. It’s like a small cuboidal box about two to three centimeters front to back and about three to four centimeters top to bottom and side to side. The cavity is lined by pseudostratified ciliated

Its all in the genes!

A 42-year-old female was seen at an outside facility for progressive bilateral hearing loss and was referred to the otology clinic. On further inquiry, she gave a history of chronic headache, mild balance difficulties and past history of tonic-clonic seizures, treated with anti-epileptics for a year. Physical examination revealed an alert and oriented patient, with

Seeing is believing

41-year-old male patient from Darjeeling, presented with complaints of painless, non-progressive swelling over the right side of the neck for the past 8 years with paroxysmal paraesthesia over the right ear for the past 8 months. He had a history of similar swelling on the left side for which he was evaluated and underwent surgical