Oropharynx

Radiotherapy is better than TORS for Oropharyngeal Cancers – ORATOR Says

The mainstay of treatment for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma is chemoradiotherapy. The separation of oropharyngeal cancers into Human papillomavirus (HPV) positive and negative based on the etiology has shown that HPV positive cancers have a better prognosis and survival compared to HPV negative cancers. These young age HPV positive patients with prolonged survival are more

Role of Surgery in the Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancers

Prior to 1990, the mainstay of treatment for oropharyngeal cancers were surgeries. These large, invasive, open approaches like mandibulotomy, tongue pull through (described below), etc were associated with severe compromise in postoperative speech, swallow and airway function of the patient due to violation of pharyngeal mucosa. In addition, surgical management did not avoid the need

Does my child need tonsillectomy? – Indications for pediatric tonsillectomy

Tonsillectomy is a surgical procedure performed with or without adenoidectomy that completely removes the tonsil, including its capsule, by dissecting the peritonsillar space between the tonsil capsule and the muscular wall. Tonsillectomy is the second-most common ambulatory surgical procedure (first being myringotomy with insertion of tubes) performed on children in the United States. In the

TNM Staging of Oropharyngeal Cancer – Updates in AJCC 8th Edition

The recently released 8th edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Staging Manual, Head and Neck Section, introduces significant modifications from the prior 7th edition. In the head and neck domain, the most significant update creates a separate staging algorithm for high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancer of the oropharynx, distinguishing it from oropharyngeal cancer (OPC)

Adenotonsillectomy lowers high blood pressure in children with OSA

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a spectrum of disorders ranging from simple snoring to complete obstruction of upper airways during sleep, which affects both children and adults. The most common cause of obstructive sleep apnea in children is chronic adenotonsillar hypertrophy, and so adenotonsillectomy is considered as the first-line treatment for OSA in children.

Clinical practice guidelines for tonsillectomy

Tonsillectomy is the second most commonly performed surgery in the United States with more than 5,30,000 procedures performed on children younger than 15 years each year. Although tonsillectomy is a routine procedure performed by general and pediatric otolaryngologists, there is significant variation in preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative patient treatment among clinicians. In order to avoid

Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

Velopharyngeal Insufficiency (VI) is the inability to temporarily close the connection between nasopharynx and oropharynx, due to an anatomical dysfunction in soft palate (velum), lateral pharyngeal wall or posterior pharyngeal wall. This can be due to insufficient tissue to accomplish closure, or due to some kind of mechanical interference with closure. An effective sealing between nasopharynx

Adenotonsillectomy can improve bedwetting in children with obstructive sleep apnea

Bladder control in children usually occurs by the age of 5 years. Nocturnal enuresis (NE) or bedwetting, is the involuntary urination during sleep, in absence of physical disease in a child older than 5 years. Nocturnal enuresis affects children of all racial groups. The estimated prevalence rate is 8% to 20% for 5-year-old children and 1.5% to 10%

Diphtheria

Diphtheria is a life-threatening acute bacterial infectious condition caused by Corynebacterium diphtheriae. The usual site of infection is the tonsils and oropharynx, but the disease can occur in nasal cavities, larynx or the skin also. History The disease was first described in the 5th century BC by Hippocrates and the bacterium was discovered by Edwin Klebs in